So for those of you who find yourself changing wheel bearings frequently – here’s a pretty cool tool I received from KMK Offroad. It’s a machined to be an exact fit to the inner diameter of a RZR 1000/900 wheel bearing and takes the work out of trying to keep a socket centered up when pushing/hammering a bearing into the hub.

As it’s currently configured, it doesn’t work to push bearings out, but that may change if the design changes.

Cost: $60+$8 shipping.

Contact: Michael Segers at KMK Offroad (https://www.facebook.com/KMKOFFROAD/)

This is with a wheel bearing on it so show fitment. The bearing is frosty from being in the freezer.

I used a shop press to push my bearings out (had to use the socket because this is a hair too big to push through the hub) and then used this tool and a propane torch to heat the hubs and to push them in. I used 4 different methods to put all 4 bearings in. All 4 of my bearings were kept in my freezer for 4 days until I could get to changing them.

1) Heat the hub pretty significantly, remove bearing from freezer, and it essentially fell in. It only needed one tap with this pusher to seat it completely and install the snap ring.

Pros: Takes virtually no effort to get the bearing to seat.
Cons: Had to wait 20-30 minutes for the hub to cool down and reassemble everything. Really slows down the process.

2) Heat the hub less than the first option, remove bearing from freezer, and push it in using the tool. It took me probably 5 hits to completely seat it and install the snap ring.

Pros: Still easy to push the bearing and it takes less time to cool down. Easier than keeping a socket centered up.
Cons: Fewest in my opinion. 8-10 minute cooldown.

3) Heat the hub very briefly, remove bearing from freezer, and push it in using the tool. This was probably a 15-20 hit process to fully seat and install the snap ring.

Pros: Very little cooldown time to get it to handling temperature for reassembly. Easier than keeping a socket centered up.
Cons: Have to hammer on the bearings more than I’d like to do.

4) No heat to the hub, remove bearing from freezer, and hammer it in using the tool. This is shown in the video and took several hits where I stopped counting.

Pros: No cooldown time. Easier than keeping a socket centered up.
Cons: Whether it actually has a lasting impact or not; it’s the most abuse to the bearing when pushing it in.

Obviously, I could’ve used a shop press to push them all in, but I wanted to give this the test for the guys who don’t have access to a press and will be pushing theirs in using the hammer-method.

Utah RZR Rentals

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